New Ausmusic booklist on The Corner Toolkit

Why not join other music lovers in November to celebrate Ausmusic Month? Ausmusic Month is the leading annual music event held by the ABC in support of Australian music.

Ausmusic isn’t just for adults!  Shows such as the ABC’s Play School, The Justine Clarke Show, and The Wiggles band continue to get generations of children singing and dancing! Popular Australian children’s songs include The Barramundi song; Kookaburra; Bingo and, Never Smile at a Crocodile.

Tablelands Libraries at First 5 Forever Forum Talk Read Sing Play Share!

Above:  Barramundi … Cockatoo.  View demo courtesy of Tablelands Libraries at First 5 Forever Forum Talk Read Sing Play Share!

The Ausmusic booklist on The Corner Toolkit webpage has some great Australian children’s picture books to help you spread the joy of music. These include: Alpacas with Maracas by Matt Cosgrove; Baby Beats by Karen Blair; Fish Jam by Kylie Howarth and My Island Home by Neil Murray.

Alpacas with Maracas Incy Wincy Spider

Above: Some titles on the Ausmusic booklist on The Corner Toolkit.

Titles are available on the RLQ catalogue. If you’re not with RLQ you might still have them in your library or find titles like Shake a Leg by Boori Monty Pryor on Story Box Library and other eresource platforms. You can also borrow storytelling resources from State Library including: There was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Mozzie by P Crumble, Bananas in Pyjamas and Music.

You can print and share the Ausmusic booklist with parents, include some of the titles in your next storytelling session or have an Ausmusic display in your young people’s area.

The First 5 Forever recent article Rhymes for Babies, Toddler and Pre-schoolers  says that from day one, young children love the sound of their parent or carer’s voice. Through sharing songs and traditional rhymes, babies learn and respond by making sounds that soon become their first words. Singing also helps them learn how language works. Families can sing rhymes in any language spoken at home. Find out more about the benefits of music on the First 5 Forever website.

Aunty Mavis Bani of Torres Shire Council's Ngulaig Meta library treating IKC conference delegates to a rendition of ‘One, Two, Three, Four, Five’ in Mabuiag

AboveView Aunty Mavis Bani of Torres Shire Council’s Ngulaig Meta library treating IKC conference delegates to a rendition of ‘One, Two, Three, Four, Five’ in Mabuiag.

The Brain and Creativity Institute found that music ignites intellectual, social and emotional, motor, language, and overall literacy, helping the body and mind work together. Dancing to music also helps children build motor skills and practice self-expression. (From Children and Music: Benefits of Music in Child Development From Bright Horizons .com cited 8/11/2018)

Enjoy Australian music with the children in your library and let families know about the new Corner Toolkit Ausmusic booklist available now.