Category Archives: Fellowship Back

The scene of the (war) crime

Guest Blogger Victoria Carless, Q ANZAC 100 Fellow 2016-17 It was in the surrounding countryside, over several months in 2017, that the muddy and bloody battle of Passchendaele was fought. In October alone, over 6,600 Australian lives were lost. Many of the headstones here remain unnamed. I’ve always had a hunch that to write authentically about a place it’s important … Read more

Queensland women poets and the First World War: Building a digital anthology

Paula-Fitzgerald Negative number: 83081, John Oxley Library, SLQ

Guest Blogger Maria Quirk, QANZAC100 Fellow 2016-17 I began my Q Anzac 100 Fellowship researching what motivated women to engage in war work. Throughout the course of my research, looking at documents, diaries, letters and other writings from women of this period, what immediately captured my attention was the poetry of Queensland women during the … Read more

Field Service Postcard

Field service postcard - front, record # 21128636310002061 John Oxley Library, SLQ

Guest Blogger: Mark Cryle, 2016-17 Q ANZAC 100: memories for a new generation Fellow Among the artefacts commonly found in collections of correspondence from World War 1 veterans is the Field Service Postcard. They constituted a significant percentage of the vast correspondence that travelled between the battle front and the home front during the war … Read more

Impacts of desertion

Hyde Park Corner at Messines, Belgium. John Oxley Library, State Library of Queensland. Neg 119608

Guest blogger: Victoria Carless – Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation Fellow During the process of researching and writing my novel on desertion during the Great War, I’ve come to learn that the decision to leave one’s post and one’s mates often had severe implications.  Not only in that moment and during the war, but … Read more

Archivists of loss

Front page of the Christmas edition of The Queenslander, 2 December 1916 John Oxley Library Neg # 189832

During the writing of my PhD on the origins of Anzac Day I became increasingly aware of the differences between the public and private versions of memorialisation of the catastrophic events of World War 1. The public, collective process of memorialising was largely men’s business. It was men who organised and promoted Anzac Day commemoration … Read more