2014 UQ ARCHITECTURE LECTURE SERIES–LIAM YOUNG

The 2014 UQ Architecture lecture series is here! This Tuesday 15 April will feature Liam Young from Tomorrows Thoughts Today.

Pushing the boundaries of radical theoretical futures, Liam is a UQ expat who will return to Brisbane for next week’s lecture, sharing his theorems for future urbanism.

We asked Liam for his top design resources and found some great interviews and videos on his work…

Liam-Young_courtesy-of-reonate-festival

 

Liam’s top design resources

Landscape Futures by Geoff Manaugh

Future Practice: Conversations from the edge of architecture by Rory Hyde

AD: System City edited by Mike Weinstock

AD: New Pastoralism edited by Mark Titman

Utopia Forever edited by Luka Feireiss

Volume #31 Guilty Landscapes edited by Liam Young and Kate Davies

Volume #35 Everything Under Control edited by Ole Bouman, Rem Koolhaas, Mark Wigley

 

Liam’s work

Unknown Fields Division on Vimeo

Future Perfect on Vimeo

 

Interviews with Liam

Postmatter interview liam Young on Future Cities

BBC Click Online interview Liam Young about living technologies

DAMnº interviews curator Liam Young about Future Perfect, at the Lisbon Architecture Triennale 2013

Artists in Laboratories talks to Liam Young in London

 

Liam will speak as part of the 2014 UQ Architecture lecture series on Tuesday 15 April from 6pm. Tickets are FREE, bookings required.

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2014 UQ Architecture lecture series–Chris Knapp

The 2014 UQ Architecture lecture series is here! This Tuesday 8 April will feature Mathew Aitchison from UQ and Chris Knapp for Bond University.

To get your warmed up for Tuesday night, we asked Chris a few questions about what you can expect to hear from their lecture, what inspires him and who his double doppelgänger is…

What does a typical day look like for you?

Book-ended by spending time with my family, a typical day includes coordinating and teaching my subjects in design, technology, and materials research in the Masters program at the Abedian School of Architecture at Bond University. A typical day would also include a meeting or two related to my role as program Discipline Leader – working on the curriculum development, putting out fires, etc, and on less typical days, I attend to my private architectural practice and my PhD studies through RMIT.

 

What can attendees to your UQ Architecture lecture expect to hear?

Guests to the lecture can expect to hear someone who is passionate about stimulating evolution in the discipline of architecture.

 

Where do you go to get design inspiration?

I am very interested in both local and global discussion around all things architectural. I spend a great deal of time paying attention to journals and interactive media from both educational and professional platforms. I draw inspiration from other disciplines, or phenomena, that are spatial, visual, and/or organizational – from an interest in natural systems like geomorphology, to free-form jazz composition, or a technological artifact like the LHC. I also love a beautifully made book – the real thing in my hands – no ebook or website can top that.

 

What are your top 5 favourite design books?

Massive Change by Bruce Mau/Institute without Boundaries

SMLXL by Rem Koolhas

Instrumental Form (Boss Architecture: words, buildings, machines) by Wes Jones

Envisioning Information by Edward Tufte

The Atlas of Novel Tectonics by Reiser + Umemoto

 

If you weren’t a designer, what would you do?

Everything is a design opportunity, even teaching – which is what I do when I’m not “designing.” That said, in an alternate life playing ice hockey professionally would be a dream, even if unattainable with my level of skill.

 

What has been your greatest achievement?

My greatest achievement has been almost 10 years in the making: it has been a steady transition from arriving in Australia with just a backpack-full of tools to build a Wilkinson-award winning house (the BURST*003 House designed by systemarchitects – itself one of my proudest achievements), to ultimately establishing a richly intense life here with my Australian wife and two daughters that has included forging a new school of architecture, building up a design practice, and become an Australian citizen.

Outside of design, what inspires your work?

Sleep.
Who is your double doppelgänger?

In terms of appearance, I’ve been told I look like the Natural Born Killers version of Woody Harrelson (although surely not that fit), and intellectually speaking, I would combine that with one of my favourite architect/thinkers, the former Dean of Princeton, Stan Allen (although I’m certainly nowhere near as intelligent).

Bonus!

As a bonus both Chris and co-presenter for next week’s UQ Architecture lecture Mathew Aitchison gave us their recommended reading for their lecture–’Prefab: a potted history’…

Chris Knapp

The MoMA book on prefab housing

Kieran Timberlake’s “Refabricating Architecture” is also key

Greg Lynn’s “Animate Form

And this one, Bob Sheil’s “Manufacturing the Bespoke

 

Mathew Aitchison

Home Deliver:Fabricating the Modern Dwelling by Barry Bergdoll, Peter Christensen, Ron Broadhurst, and Museum of Modern Art

Prefab Houses by Arnt Cobbers, Oliver Jahn, and Peter Gössel (eds.)

The Prefabricated Home by Colin Davies

Prefab Architecture by Loft Publications, (eds.)

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2014 UQ Architecture lecture series–Penny Collins & Huw Turner

The 2014 UQ Architecture lecture series is here! This Tuesday 1 April will feature Penny Collins and Huw Turner from Collins and Turner Architects.

To get your warmed up for Tuesday night, we asked Huw and Penny a few questions about what you can expect to hear from their lecture, what inspires them and who their double doppelgänger’s are…

What does a typical day look like for you?

We have vastly diverse projects on, at various stages from design through to construction. This week has seen us working on Pre -DA drawings for a 20 storey apartment tower, design details for a 1400sqm bar in Brisbane, with weekly site visits now it is under construction. Council meeting to get DA approved for a $2m house. Construction completions of a $4m house. Revised DA drawings for an $8m house – to make it larger! Endless meetings with Lend Lease, the Barangaroo Dvevelopment Authority and a myriad of consultants on our restaurant building, heading for planning permission.

 A typical day can involve 3-4 client or consultant meetings with staff briefings and project reviews fitted in between.

What can attendees to your UQ Architecture lecture expect to hear?

About the recent and ongoing adventures in architecture of two people from opposite sides of the world, who met working in Germany for Norman Foster.

 

Where do you go to get design inspiration?

We find inspiration in everything, but perhaps least of all in architecture itself.

With each project we try to distill the brief into a singular conceptual gesture – a simple strong idea. We then work hard to try to carry that through into the finished project, battling courageously against dark forces of budget, statutory controls, and construction restraints, to try to realise the original vision.

The place that we go to think is our getaway at Pittwater on Sydney’s northern beaches – it’s our chill-out space, a bit like a river island, and we go there to clear our heads, think, and draw. Between that we swim, cook, read, and sleep. Things that we don’t do enough of in the city.

 

What are your top 5 favourite design books?

Huw:

Archigram by Peter Cook

In praise of Shadows by Jun’ichirō Tanizaki

Architecture by Donald Judd

If you weren’t a designer, what would you do?

Penny: Property Developer, so that I could still shape the built environment

Huw: My father was a filmmaker, and as a teenager living on a cold, wet, mountain in rural Wales,  I dreamt of living by the beach in California and doing movie special effects for a living.

I still think that getting paid to make spacecraft and blow things up would be an incredible day job.

We have somebody working for us whose sister works for Weta digital in Wellington, designing the textures of aliens skin for the Avatar sequels. I’m very jealous.

 

What has been your greatest achievement?

The positive feedback for the Waterloo Youth Centre, has been fantastic. Staying in business feels like a result also.

 

Outside of Design, what inspires your work?

Travel, play of light, landscape, cinema…

 

Who is your double doppelgänger?

We often get mistaken for Phil Collins and Tina Turner…

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2014 UQ Architecture lecture series–Martyn Hook

The 2014 UQ Architecture lecture series is here! Kicking off THIS Tuesday 25 March with Martyn Hook and Finn Pedersen from iredale pedersen hook, the series is sure to create new knowledge and provoke discussion around the practice of architecture, in line with curator John deManicor’s theme of ’720+’.

To get your warmed up for Tuesday night, we asked Martyn Hook a few questions about what you can expect to hear from their lecture, what inspires them and who their double doppelgänger’s are…

What does a typical day look like for you?
At any point in time Finn, will be on a plane to the far North West to drive for an hour or more to a project across red dust, on the other hand I  will be on a tram poking at my phone or scratching in a small notebook and Adrian might be driving to the South West with water colour sketches in hand to discuss a project and a surfboard in the back.

What can attendees to your UQ Architecture lecture expect to hear?
A chat about some ideas behind an architectural practice by me then pictures of buildings in the desert and a chat about why they are there by Finn. 

Where do you go to get design inspiration?
IN EVERYTHING! Architects begin as perceptive observers.

What are your top 5 favourite design books?
These are mine…Finn and Adrian may or may not agree…its the nature of our practice.

Mies in America by Phyllis Lambert

Natural History by Herzog & de Meuron

Works by Martin Creed

RE:CP by Cedric Price

Changing the Art of Inhabitation by Alison and Peter Smithson

*For bonus points, check out Adrian’ s fav design books at the end of this post!

If you weren’t a designer, what would you do?
Hmmm. The only other career I considered was Marine Biology. Finn would be rock climbing. Adrian? pro surfer! 

What has been your greatest achievement?
Remaining

Outside of Design, what inspires your work?
See question 3 (top 5 fav design books).

Who is your double doppelgänger? 
This is hard. Ok.  Adrian; Patrick Swayze in Point Break with Mr Bean, and Finn; Willy Wonka (the original) with David Attenborough, Martyn; George Clooney and Hugh Laurie in House.

Adrian Iredale

Adrian Iredale

Finn Pedersen

Finn Pedersen

Martyn Hook

Martyn Hook

Martyn will speak alongside Finn Pedersen as part of the 2014 UQ Architecture lecture series on Tuesday 25 March from 6pm. Tickets are FREE, bookings required.

 

Bonus–Adrian’s top 5 fav design books…

Hans Scharoun by Peter Blundell Jones

Alvaro Siza by Cianchetta Alessandra & Molteni Enrico

Back to the Front: Tourisms of War by Ricardo Scofidio & Elizabeth Diller

Sigurd Lewerentz two part book series
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Cultural Change in Queensland Education

Photo by Orion Zuyhderhoff-Gray

Over two weeks in late February/early March 2014, APDL through Design Minds has facilitated three professional development workshops for Queensland Graphics teachers.

The workshops have come about as a result of the release of two new Design Minds toolkits, Design Factors and Design Process, which were created in collaboration with The Smith Family Partnership Brokers, Hames Sharley Architects and a reference panel of south-east Queensland senior Graphics teachers. These toolkits we developed to support the implementation of the new Queensland Graphics Syllabus developed by the Queensland Studies Authority.

These professional development days signaled a couple of firsts for Design Minds. Firstly, it is the first time that we have developed resources and run professional development for one particular teaching group / curriculum area; in this case senior Graphics. Up until now, our resources have been targeted to support broad implementation across the curriculum. It was also the first time that we have run a regional workshop, travelling up to Townsville based on the requests of passionate teachers up there looking to further their design thinking teaching.

Presenting prototypes at the Townsville workshop

From my perspective, it’s been a very interesting and at times challenging process as we’ve grown to understand the needs of this teaching group and the role that design thinking can play in supporting them. We realised early on in the process that our role wasn’t to tell anyone how to teach or give “point A to point B” instructions on how to teach design thinking in the classroom. Instead, our aim has been to provide a range of resources that will allow teachers to gradually embed, (at their own and their students’ pace), this kind of thinking into their classroom. Our aim has also been to create platforms for these teachers to connect and share their common experiences and challenges both in person and online.

Photo by Orion Zuyderhoff-Gray

Having worked with 72 teachers from across SEQ and Townsville, I’ve had quite a few insights on the role of design thinking in their classrooms and also the enormous cultural change that these teachers are facing. I observed that:

  • Many of the teachers have come from a technical or trade background (many with 15-20 years of experience in teaching the technical aspects of Graphics)
  • These teachers are facing the greatest cultural change; having to adapt their expertise in “graphical production” to now encompass the higher-order thinking skills within the design thinking process
  • I was overwhelmed by how open these teachers are to embracing this cultural change. Most are ready for the change and see the value that engendering these high-order thinking skills will have on the future of their young people
  • Many teachers noted that the greatest cultural change may need to come from the students themselves, who for now at least have been conditioned over many years to thinking “linearly” and non-creatively and have arrived at senior Graphics with an expectation that they will simply be learning how to draw and model in 3D. Encouraging these students to embody design thinking is this group of teachers’ greatest challenge.

Photo by Orion Zuyderhoff-Gray

There was also one great moment that I recall at the end of our Townsville workshop, where one of the teachers stood up and shared his frustrations with the ongoing changes to the preferred types of CAD and 3D modelling software used over the years. This teacher confessed to having to search on Youtube to learn the basics of new software before attempting to teach it to students. This teacher was feeling the pinch for not being an “expert”. This lead to an enlightening conversation amongst the group around the changing role of the teacher as the “facilitator” of learning experiences, rather than the “expert” who is expected to impart knowledge down onto the students.

There was a great sense of relief among the group in the realisation that the value of the teacher is in guiding and putting a spotlight on areas of knowledge and resources.

Photo by Orion Zuyderhoff-Gray

I was immensely inspired to work with this passionate group of teachers and I am continually in awe of anyone who assumes this great responsibility to educate our young people. The fact that many of these teachers even choose to advance their teaching by embracing new methods like design thinking is all the more inspiring.

We’ve been contacted by teachers from other areas of the state inviting us to continue these PD days in their area and we hope that we can continue to play a role in supporting not only Graphics teachers but all teachers in embracing this cultural change to transform Queensland into the leading knowledge economy within the Asia Pacific.

Our first Design Minds ‘Introduction to Design Thinking‘ professional development day is happening on the 30 April 2014 and tickets will sell fast. This workshop is designed for teachers across all curriculum areas, looking to harness design thinking to engender more critical and higher-order thinking among their students. Book here.

 

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Arch-I-Spy competition

The 2014 UQ Architecture lecture series is here! To celebrate we’re running a competition called Arch-I-Spy, an architectural game of I-Spy with weekly prizes.

Each week we’ll ask you to post a snapshot of an architectural detail from a building using the hashtag #ArchISpy, asking people to guess the building. This then sparks conversation about the work.

What building am I? #ArchISpy

What building am I? #ArchISpy

Series curator John de Manicor from UQ School of Architecture will judge the best photo each week, announcing it at the lecture and displaying it in the design lounge. At the end of the series all weekly winners will be judged by John for an overall winner and by APDL’s social media followers for a people’s choice winner.

Prizes up for grabs include architectural magazines, books and one of the APDL’s Design Delivery curated collections.

This week’s winner will be announced at the first UQ Architecture lecture series event on Tuesday 25 March, so spread the word and get involved!

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From the curator–2014 UQ Architecture lecture series

With the 2014 UQ Architecture lecture series less than a week away we thought we’d talk to series curator, John de Manincor from UQ about the theme of the series and what we can expect from the speakers.

John is Senior Lecturer in Professional Practice and Design at the UQ School of Architecture and a registered, practicing architect and Director of THE ARCHITECTURE OFFICE (AO). He has collaborated with leading local and international architects and from 2006-2013 he led Sydney-based practice DRAW: DE MANINCOR RUSSELL ARCHITECTURE WORKSHOP with Adam Russell.

Alongside practice, John has been involved in architectural education for more than 15 years, teaching technology, practice and design at The University of Technology Sydney (UTS), The University of Sydney and The University of New South Wales (UNSW) and has lectured widely in Australia and abroad.

2014 UQ Architecture lecture series curator–John de Manincor

“There are parallels between the various tasks of an architecture school and the role of the contemporary library. They are not places where one finds existing, static information but rather places that generate new knowledge.

UQ has an excellent reputation as a both a teaching and research institution. This year, particularly in our Masters Degree, we are bringing our research to the design studio; asking students to expand upon the various areas of expertise of our staff along with a number of leading practitioners. Our staff and our students are producing new knowledge.

One of the great delights in browsing a library is to stumble across other things you were not actually looking for, you often come away with something new.

This year’s lecture series is entitled “720 +”, after the Dewey system code for architecture. With this year’s lecture series we are hoping our speakers will be that other thing … something beyond what is already “in” the library, the “+”.

This series is not about established super-stars but rising ones, engaged in the generation of new knowledge who will give the audience something to think about. We’ve invited speakers who are recognised as leading designers and thinkers, award-winners and provocateurs.”

The 2014 UQ Architecture lecture series runs every Tuesday from 25 March to 20 May, excluding 22 April. Tickets are FREE, bookings required.

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UR{BNE} Films–Sonia Kirby

The annual UR{BNE} Films event returns to SLQ to explore the question ‘what are we losing in the growth of our cities?’. Three panelists will take to the stage to respond to this question in a PechaKucha-style presentation, followed by a screening of feature documentary, The City Dark (83mins).

Today we profile panelist Sonia Kirby, Director and Founder, Establish Consulting. Sonia will present on the topic of ’Losing our sense of wonder’ at the event.

Sonia is a self-professed planning nerd and proud of it.

“Having worked in the industry for over 14 years, both throughout Australia, and overseas, I feel that I have the responsibility to contribute my knowledge and skills to planning for the places to live, work and play for the coming decades (possibly centuries). I am an environmental planner by trade, strategic planner in practice, and creative soul.

With over 14 years experience  in both the public and private sector,  I have the skills and experience to interrogate ‘wicked problems’ and find innovative solutions. I am inspired by watching how people interact with space, how they celebrate place, and how they demonstrate their passion for their place through art, events, or installations of identity.”

She is the Director and Founder of Establish Consulting, a firm based on the principles of design-thinking, community participation, and evidenced-based planning.

Sonia has also been actively involved in the Planning Institute of Australia for over 10 years, having held the International Division President role for the last 3 years. She is committed to ensuring planners throughout Australia and around the world stand up and be counted as integral to the creation of amazing built environment outcomes, and demonstrate their creative flair and technical skills in doing so.

Sonia is inspired through her travels overseas, active involvement in urban design and placemaking initiatives, and diving the deep blue sea.

Appearing alongside Sonia will be Tobias Volbert, Landscape Architect and founder  7 Senses Foundation on the topic of ’Losing our human senses’ and Paul Songhurst, Public Space Planner, Brisbane City Council on ’Losing our sense of style’.

Event details
Date         Sunday 30 March
Time         4pm-6pm
Venue      Auditorium 1 and QLD Terrace, Level 2, SLQ
Tickets     Free, bookings through Eventbrite

UR{BNE} films is part of the UR{BNE} Festival program which explores urban design, architecture, public spaces and the collaborative design process.

Presented by SLQ’s SLiQ Flicks and Asia Pacific Design Library in support of the UR{BNE} Festival.

A Space for Spirituality: Dutton Park Community House

There’s a new pop up exhibition in kuril dhagun (level 1 of SLQ) by QUT Interior Design students.

The students worked in consultation with the Murri Watch Men’s Shed in Dutton Park to create proposals for the adaption of the current building.

Image by Andrew Trimmer and Marissa Lindquist (2004)

As designers it is important to work with communities to develop inclusive spaces and be mindful of the diversity of cultures, histories and indeed spirituality.

The Murri Watch Men’s Shed is a place that was set up to provide a private sanctuary and sacred gathering place for the youth and men of the local indigenous community. The founders were interested in helping men to deal with problems associated with alcohol, substance abuse, violence, institutionalisation, marginalisation and isolation and have found that their most successful programmes have been art workshops, talking circles and day trips to local places of interest.

This exhibition includes a selection of proposals for the adaptation of the Murri Watch Men’s Shed. The designs respond to local community narratives and environmental qualities, such as site texture, landscape and light to propose a dwelling space for spirituality and gathering and will be on display until 25 March,2014.

Image by Andrew Trimmer and Marissa Lindquist (2004).

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UR{BNE} Films–Paul Songhurst

The annual UR{BNE} Films event returns to SLQ to explore the question ‘what are we losing in the growth of our cities?’. Three panelists will take to the stage to respond to this question in a PechaKucha-style presentation, followed by a screening of feature documentary, The City Dark (83mins).

Today we profile panelist Paul Songhurst, Public Space Planner, Brisbane City Council. Paul will present on the topic of  ’Losing our sense of style’ at the event.

Paul talked to recently talked to Volunteering Queensland about his work as a landscape architect and with a group called YES (Youth Environment Society). Here is some of what he had to share…

Paul is currently pursuing his interest in the “interaction (or collision) between people and the natural environment” working as a landscape architect, which gives him the opportunity to work on “a range of projects that are beneficial environmentally, socially and culturally”.

This passion also inspires Paul to coordinate a youth-focused environmental organisation/network/project called Youth Environment Society (YES), whose mission is “to inform, inspire and empower young people to make positive change regarding our environment, both natural and cultural”, which closely links to Paul’s personal vision.

In his role with YES Paul works in an advisory capacity to state and local government regarding issues of biodiversity, accessibility, sustainability, environment and natural resources and regional planning issues. In the past he has facilitated and coordinated a number of interesting projects that would generally fall into the realm of “creative responses to environmental concerns”.

Paul’s inspiration is ultimately derived from an “optimistic outlook on life and the world around us… I see the work of community collectives as being incredibly important for the community” Paul states.

If he considered himself to be a ‘community leader’, Paul would say his major achievements have been producing “creative responses to environmental and social concerns” through various projects with YES and Brisbane City Council’s Visible Ink program.

“YES was effectively formed with the aim to respond creatively to a wide array of ‘environmental’ concerns. In looking at certain environmental concerns, such as air pollution, land degradation, erosion, salinity, habitat loss, resource consumption and so on, one can start with traditional responses to environmental concerns such as tree planting and similar hands-on responses. It was identified early on that there is a significant contingent tackling such responses and it was an aim of YES to look at different ways to create positive change for our environment and in doing so, involve a wide array of young people in our community, often those that would not be directly involved in such things as tree-planting and the like.”

Appearing alongside Paul will be Tobias Volbert,  Landscape Architect and founder  7 Senses Foundation on the topic of ’Losing our human senses’ and Sonia Kirby, Director and Founder, Establish Consulting on ’Losing our sense of wonder’.

Event details
Date         Sunday 30 March
Time         4pm-6pm
Venue      Auditorium 1 and QLD Terrace, Level 2, SLQ
Tickets     Free, bookings through Eventbrite

UR{BNE} films is part of the UR{BNE} Festival program which explores urban design, architecture, public spaces and the collaborative design process.

Presented by SLQ’s SLiQ Flicks and Asia Pacific Design Library in support of the UR{BNE} Festival.

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